20×24 Studio bio picture
  • 20×24 Studio, the Home of Large Format Instant Photography

    It has been four years since 20x24 Holdings LLC took possession of the film inventory and production equipment required for large format 20x24 instant film from Polaroid Corporation. In that time we have set up production facilities in Dudley, Massachusetts and a inventory spooling and pod production facility in Putnam, CT. We continue to offer access to this venerable technology through our studio at Lincoln Center as well as the 20x24 Studio West in San Francisco. Film is also available to owners of 20x24 instant systems through direct sales. The New York Studio and 20x24 Holdings LLC is managed by Executive Director John Reuter. His experience spans nearly thirty five years in large format instant photography. Joining us in the fall of 2012 is Nafis Azad, our new Director of Photography. The 20x24 Studio will expand with two new cameras in 2014. For further information e-mail us at info@20x24studio.com or call 347-614-1818.

Jennifer Trausch, The South

Jennifer Trausch has been Director of Photography at the 20×24 Studio since 2003. In that time she has worked with dozens of artists, both in the studio and on location. No one knows the possibilities and limitations of the medium as well as Trausch. Known primarily as an indoor studio camera that uses high powered electronic strobes as its light source, the 20×24 camera is capable of location work. It requires a very large truck, substantial support equipment to protect and stabilize the machine outdoors, but more importantly an understanding of the camera’s capabilities and even more crucial understanding of the film’s response to rapidly changing light conditions. Trausch’s experience with the camera put her in a unique position to exploit the potential of ultra large format photography on location and minimize the disasters always awaiting the inexperienced. Leaving the powerful strobe lighting behind in the studio, Trausch instead exposed with available light, often requiring long exposures, even with the more sensitive Black and White Polaroid emulsion. One must work quickly and confidently to calculate the considerable bellows extension and stay on top of ever-changing light conditions. The technical tour de force alone makes this body of work noteworthy. More impressive are the relationships Trausch develops with her subjects, making connections that few photographers attempt to make.
Here are some of Trausch’s own words describing her project; “In my current body of work shot in the American South, I chose to put the 20×24 Polaroid Camera in active and unpredictable circumstances on the road. In doing this I am filtering out all of the traditional notions of 20×24 shooting, defining my own vision for it. Having operated the camera for seven years, I am very familiar with this handmade machine and understand how colors and light render on its film.  I am one of the few people who are not intimidated by its mass, the sheer physicality of shooting on it, and its cumbersome and awkward nature in the field. I have chosen to eschew structure in favor of a looser, more intuitive approach of finding my subject. I depict the subtle progression of a subject or environment over a long exposure. During these long exposures a subject may move, the light may change and embracing these details rather than avoiding them is how my own work differs from the typical approach to the medium.”

20×24 Studio Featured Artist: Ellen Carey

One of the more unique artists working with Polaroid 20×24 technology today is Ellen Carey. Ellen first began using the 20×24 in 1982 while it was housed at the Museum of Fine Arts School in Boston. Ellen’s first work was a series of self portraits, lit with colored gels and later painted with enamel paint. These evolved into another series of self portraits made in New York that combined close up portraits lit with colored gels with intricate collages of black and white graphic images.
These multiple exposures blended the abstract and narrative in compelling complexity. In the 1990s Carey moved on to produce the series of “Pulls” and “Rollbacks”. Eliminating the figure altogether, Carey created these abstract images taking full advantage of the camera as a printmaking machine. Exploiting the roll film nature of the system, Carey produced pieces sometimes seven to ten feet in length by letting the camera run beyond its usual stopping point. At times, the positive would be cut away from the negative and “rolled back” into the camera for additional exposures and developing.

Click here to see more of Ellen’s work and excerpts from the essay “Ellen Carey, Matrix to Monumental”, by Ben Lifson.
Ellen Carey, 20×24 Pulls and Rollbacks, Part 1
Ellen Carey, 20×24 Pulls and Rollbacks, Part 2
You can see more of Ellen’s work at her website: Ellen Carey Photography

You can see more of Ben Lifson’s works and writings at: Ben Lifson

Ellen Carey, 20x24 Polaroid Pulls

April 3, 2010 - 12:08 pm

Alex Gordon - Совершенно случайное совпадение…

One of the more unique artists working with Polaroid 20×24 technology today is Ellen Carey…..